Covid-19 compliant training

Due to the Covid-19 crisis, safety measures have been implemented by the CDC and other governing bodies, until an unknown future date. This includes 1 to 1 ratio practice with gloves, hand sanitizer and masks, which means no face to face practice with a training partner in close proximity (as is common). No mouth to mouth practice (if typically required for the specific course). Students are spaced out at a minimum of 6 feet from other students. Zoom (distance learning) training may be offered, depending on course type and requirements.

Zoom-based training

Some courses can be provided through the Zoom training option. Courses that do not require written test compliance. The equipment that is needed for the training (ie: Manikins, Epi-Pen trainers) are dropped off in advance to the student. The training is provided with the instructor supervising and offering encouragement and correction over the Zoom portal. This can be offered for individuals, we well as groups. Contact us for more info.

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respirator fit testing

What is a Respirator Fit Test? Why might you need one?

If you/your employees work in a hazardous environment with harmful dusts, fumes, gases, etc., the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires them to wear respirators. A respirator protects the wearer against toxic atmospheres, allowing them to breathe with reduced exposure to respirable toxins. But before an employee uses a respirator, they must complete a medical examination and respirator fit test.

With new regulatory standards for silica exposure, more employees are now required to wear respirators. If you’re new to the process, or just need a refresher, here’s a brief overview of how to prepare for and what to expect with a respirator fit test.

What the Respirator Fit Test Covers

The respirator fit test will start with a medical evaluation before the actual fit testing can begin. After the evaluation is completed, a healthcare provider will review the completed questionnaire and provide the employee & employer with a written recommendation (if it is safe for the employee to wear a respirator, and any limitations. The fit test administrator does not require a specific certification, but they do need to be trained on how to conduct the test.
If the employee is cleared to wear a respirator, they will go through one of two fit tests: a qualitative fit test or a quantitative fit test. Currently, Enos CPR Services can only provide Qualitative Fit Tests.

What does a qualitative fit test cover?

A qualitative fit test (QLFT) can only be used to test negative pressure respirators and tight- fitting face pieces used with powered and atmosphere-supplying respirators. It is a pass/fail test that relies on the respirator user’s senses.


How to Prepare for a Respirator Fit Test

Before an employee starts their respirator fit test, there are a few items they need to prepare beforehand.

 • Select a respirator. When choosing a respirator, employers should consider
    what toxins the employee is exposed to, the concentration of the toxins, job
    responsibilities, time spent exposed, and more. The equipment must be
    NIOSH-certified. The employee will need to bring the chosen respirator to
    their fit test. If they wear more than one mask, they will need to have all of
    them available for the fit test.

 • Bring protective equipment. If the employee wears any other personal
    protective equipment (PPE) that could interfere with the respirator’s seal,
    they must bring those items to the fit test. This can include safety glasses,
    hearing protection, face shields, hard hats, and coveralls.

 • Shave. Your male employees will need to be clean-shaven for their respirator
    fit test. OSHA requires this because facial hair can interfere with a respirators fit.
  
 • Complete a medical evaluation questionnaire. OSHA required a medical
    evaluation before any employee can be fit-tested for a respirator. The
    employee will need to complete an OSHA Respirator Medical Evaluation
    Questionnaire, which the employer is required to provide time for their
    employee to complete. The employee needs to bring the completed
    questionnaire to their respirator fit test, as it must be reviewed by a physician
    or other licensed health care provider (PLHCP).

How to Prepare for a Respirator Fit Test

Before an employee starts their respirator fit test, there are a few items they need to prepare beforehand.

  • Select a respirator. When choosing a
   respirator, employers should consider what
   toxins the employee is exposed to, the
   concentration of the toxins, job
   responsibilities, time spent exposed, and
   more. The equipment must be NIOSH-
   certified. The employee will need to bring
   the chosen respirator to their fit test. If they
   wear more than one mask, they will need to
   have all of them available for the fit test.

  • Bring protective equipment. If the employee
   wears any other personal protective
   equipment (PPE) that could interfere with
   the respirator’s seal, they must bring those
   items to the fit test. This can include safety
   glasses, hearing protection, face shields, hard
   hats, and coveralls.

  • Shave. Your male employees will need to be
   clean-shaven for their respirator fit test.
   OSHA requires this because facial hair can
   interfere with a respirators fit.
  
  • Complete a medical evaluation
   questionnaire. OSHA required a medical
   evaluation before any employee can be fit-
   tested for a respirator. The employee will
   need to complete an OSHA Respirator
   Medical Evaluation Questionnaire, which the
   employer is required to provide time for their
   employee to complete. The employee needs
   to bring the completed questionnaire to
   their respirator fit test, as it must be reviewed
   by a physician or other licensed health care
   provider (PLHCP).

There are four OSHA-accepted test agents:

• Isoamyl acetate
• Saccharin
• Bitrex®
• Irritant smoke

The respirator’s filter determines which agent is tested.

For the respirator fit test, the respirator user will perform seven exercises for one minute each:

• Normal breathing
• Deep breathing
• Moving head side to side
• Moving head up and down
• Bending over
• Talking
• Normal breathing again

If the worker doesn’t detect any odor or irritation during these exercises, the worker is safe to wear those specific respirator(s).

Mandatory OSHA Medical Clearance

Enos CPR has coordinated with 3M and Resp Safety to provide quality online Medical Clearance

3M Respirator Medical Questionnaire

$29 each staff member, the 1st 2 are free

Resp Safety Medical Questionnaire

$22 per individual, with discount for 5+ staff

Good Samaritan Laws

When an emergency happens, a Good Samaritan is a person who voluntarily tries to help, without expectation or compensation. Good Samaritan Laws are intended to protect those who offer assistance of any type from being held liable if their actions end up causing unintended harm, or the outcome is poor.

Without laws to protect people trying to help when a sudden emergency occurs, many would walk away, for fear of being sued (or worse). In many emergencies, a delay can mean the difference between life and death. Good Samaritan Laws are intended to encourage people to help each other in emergency situations, before EMS arrives, but also to act responsibly whenever doing so.

Good Samaritan Law in California

In the state of California, the Good Samaritan Law falls under California Health and Safety Code Section 1799.102. This law states that when a person renders emergency care and acts in good faith without expecting compensation, they can’t be held liable for their acts or omissions.

The exception would be if their acts demonstrate gross negligence or wanton misconduct. For example, the Good Samaritan could be found negligent if they CAUSED the accident/emergency in the first place, or if, during help, they INTENDED to make the situation worse, or cause unnecessary harm.

Before 2011, this law only protected individuals who were required to help when off-duty (nurses, law enforcement, EMS). The law has since been amended to protect people ANYONE who offers voluntary help of any kind. This includes non-medical scenarios such as clearing traffic, staying beside someone to let them know they are not alone, helping someone out of a vehicle or calling 911. It protects those who do CPR and those who own and use AEDs. It also protects the worker who assists a coworker while on-duty.

Good Samaritans are incredibly important. Without them, the outcome could be extremely poor. They are the first to provide help and call 911. There are Good Samaritan laws in all 50 states, as well as on international waters (cruise ships) and in the air (while on planes).

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